Art/Style/Travel DiariesStyle

2022 MaArte taps new-generation fashion designers

Pioneer annual bazaar, with Lisa Periquet, Trickie Lopa, Dindin Araneta at the helm, branches out from artisanship to contemporary design in fashion, furniture

Mich Dulce

HA.MÜ

HoliCOW PH

Unang Panahon

MaArte 2022 extends its content to contemporary fashion as it collaborates with the newly formed PHx Fashion Group consisting of the upcoming generation of Filipino designers. This range of new generation-fashion design participants is a first in the annual bazaar scene.

There will also be an exhibit of the masterpieces of Salvacion Lim Higgins (SLIMS) at the Peninsula lobby during MaArte. Lim-Higgins has just been given the posthumous National Artist Award.

Also, for the first time, MaArte will be run by the Philippine Art Events Inc., the group that owns and operates the annual Art Fair Philippines and Art in the Park. Behind it are Lisa O. Periquet, Trickie Lopa and Dindin Araneta—the three women who are drivers of art and culture fairs in the country. In an online press introduction, Yael Buencamino, president of the Museum Foundation of the Philippines, Inc., welcomed the three women. The Museum Foundation of the Philippines, Inc. (MFPI), which has been the beneficiary of MaArte these past years, has the mission to raise awareness of and funds for the National Museum of the Philippines and its network of museums in the regions.

Set from August 19 to 21—the third weekend of August—at The Peninsula Manila, the first on-site MaArte in the two years of the pandemic will revolve around the theme of celebrating the Filipino creative soul.

“We thought hard about what MaArte should express so we came up with ‘Celebrating the Creative Soul of the Filipino,’ which we felt runs the gamut of many fields, including contemporary design in furniture and fashion, antiquities, etc.,” Periquet told TheDiarist.ph.

“While we recognize that MaArte pioneered the efforts of championing Filipino artisans and craftsmanship, specifically traditional textiles and jewelry, the success of that 2009 effort meant that we now have a plethora of events to showcase Filipiniana apparel and home accessories,” Lopa elaborated.  “We felt that with the emergence of talent in local contemporary design scene, MaArte could again pioneer this effort of showcasing the contemporary, specifically in fashion and furniture design, while still keeping to its mission.”

MaArte started in February 2009 as a complementary event to HABI, The Second ASEAN Traditional Textiles Symposium, a four-day international conference in Manila.  As the conference’s Market Encounter, it gave delegates the opportunity to appreciate and acquire Philippine textiles and jewelry.

Since then, MaArte has grown in scope and has undergone several iterations in various venues.  In 2017, it found a new home at The Peninsula Manila and has since been rebranded as MaArte at The Pen.

MaArte at The Pen is a much-awaited annual event that celebrates Filipino craftsmanship. This year, aside from the traditional Filipino craft and design, it will showcase contemporary Philippine design in fashion, furniture and accessories. About 94 brands are featured.

TheDiarist.ph’s interview with Periquet, Lopa and Araneta:

How did the three of you come to be at the helm of this year’s MaArte? Was there a “eureka moment”? This, even if crafts, fashion, design, antiques, artisanship are a natural progression from ArtFair.

Periquet: Trickie mentioned the desire to inject contemporary design and the love of the Museum. Actually the “compelling reason” to run it was because MFPI specifically asked us to do it.  MFPI used to run this as a special committee project but it entails quite a lot of work and organizaton.  After lying low for a couple of years because of the pandemic, I think MFPI wanted a fresh take.  We agreed to take it on as long as we could have freedom to craft it the way we wanted, which they happily agreed to. We thought hard about what MaArte should express so we came up with “Celebrating the Creative Soul of the Filipino” which we felt runs the gamut of many fields, including contemporary design in furniture and fashion, antiquities, etc.

Lopa: To add to Lisa’s replies, while we recognize that MaArte pioneered the efforts of championing Filipino artisans and craftsmanship, specifically traditional textiles and jewelry, the success of that 2009 effort meant that we now have a plethora of events that showcase Filipiniana apparel and home accessories.  We felt that with the emergence of talent in the local contemporary design scene, MaArte could again pioneer this effort of showcasing the contemporary, specifically in fashion and furniture design, while still keeping to its mission.

Araneta: As Lisa mentioned, we were asked by the Museum Foundation Board if we could help co-organize it as we do Art in the Park. As former executive director and board member like Lisa and Trickie, we found this reason compelling enough. Lisa is a former president. The Museum Foundation has a history of volunteerism, advocacy and philanthropy for Philippine museums especially the National Museum and its network. So this is doing our share of helping sustain this mission. I am barely active as volunteer these days, so working on MaArte helps me fulfill some part of this.

This year, is MaArte still tapping ethnic or minorities’ communities to showcase their crafts in aid of livelihood? Or does this mission-vision belong to other organizations?

Periquet: Yes. The board is interested in looking at minorities’ work in crafts and livelihood, and how they can work together with them.  For example, this year, with the assistance of Habi, MaArte will have a showcase of traditional textiles from Ifugao-based Marlon Martin, who works with community weavers using traditional techniques and dyes.

Did you three have a long selection process of the more than 90 brands? Did you enjoy the experience?

Periquet: We wanted the loyal stalwarts of MaArte to be there, of course, after two years of the fair not being held, so we sent invitations to them.  For the rest of the particpants, yes, we had to put our heads together and that’s how we came up with the new elements of contemporary furniture and fashion, as well as heirloom elements.  If you remember the Nonesuch fair we did in 2017 (also at The Pen), we folded some of those particpants into the MaArte heirloom section.

Do you three women even have a downtime?

Periquet: Well, maybe I did….I just came back from two months away, but it was regular twice-weekly meetings throughout the holiday!

Trickie:  Actually, MaArte was a nice break from the Art Fair work!  We worked with a different set of creatives, and it was lovely meeting them all.  I always enjoy my PHx Fashion Group projects, interacting with those young designers.  That’s always hectic but fun.

Dindin: There is a fine line between passion and profession—if you love what you do.

MaArte showcases:

The SLIM exhibit at The Lobby will display nine dresses created by Salvacion Lim Higgins, notable for their mastery of native fabrics, finely made silhouette and proportion, and most important, design innovations so ahead of her time. The dresses date from 1952 to the early ‘80s, on loan from the archives of Slim’s Fashion & Arts School. The woman whose career began in post-World War II Manila shaped generations of Filipino fashion designers through her fashion school, among them fashion stalwarts themselves like Cesar Gaupo, Joey Samson.

On view at The Lobby from August 15 to 27, it is curated by artist Mark Lewis Higgins, the late designer’s son who’s now the director of Slim’s Fashion & Arts School.

To showcase the range of contemporary Filipino fashion design, this year’s bazaar collaborates with the PHx Fashion Group to introduce PHxMaArte, a section on the next generation of Filipino designers that showcases unconventional lines and global mindsets.  Among those debuting their collections are BAGASÁO, NeilFelipp, and Kelvin Morales, labels coming off stints at Tokyo Fashion Week.   Jude Macasinag flies in Manifesto, recently presented as his bachelor graduation collection at the Institut Francais de la Mode in Paris.

Also in the bazaar are mainstream apparel brands known for their use of traditional Filipino textiles and techniques:  Filip+Inna and Good Luck Humans,   Rurungan Collective,  WYC Wear Your Culture, Two Chic, and Creative Definitions + Lakat Sustainables.

Joining for the first time are some recognized purveyors of Philippine antiques, tribal art, and maps: Unang Panahon, Gallery Deus, Leon Gallery and Gallery of Prints. Among those joining in jewelry are Riqueza, Micki Olaguer, Tim Tam Ong and Natalya Lagdameo. The selection will run from pre-colonial gold trinkets to vintage estate jewelry to accessories in wood, bone, and brass for casual everyday wear.

Also marking his first time at MaArte is Ito Kish.  With him in the home accessories and furniture are MaArte stalwarts Beyond Borders, DOMESTICITY – TILIA,  and the non-profit Gifts and Graces.

To add more depth to the home section, MaArte organizers consulted architect, furniture designer, and former Bluprint magazine editor Tina Bonoan.  Her lineup includes Azcor Lighting Systems,Touch of Craft, and HOLICOW, all found at the 6th floor.

For Filipino fabrics—Balay ni Atong and WVN Living, plus Ifugao-based community weaver Marlon Martin.

MaArte talks at Salon de Ning

Presented by Ayala Land Premier, the lecture series MaArte Talks is at 2 p.m. daily from August 19 to 21 at the hotel’s Salon de Ning.  The schedule:

August 19:       A TEAPOT’S JOURNEY: A BRIEF HISTORY

Sheryl Ebon-Martinez shares her fascination with tea and how this beverage carved a path for her as a potter at 40 years old.

August 20:       PHILIPPINE DESIGN AND CRAFT TODAY BY NAZARENO/ LICHAUCO

Nazareno/Lichauco’s Rita Nazareno (Zacarias 1925) and Gabby Lichauco (Open Studio) will share insights, experiences, and practices on Philippine contemporary craft and design landscape.

August 21:       PARIS & MANILA: A TALE OF TWO CITIES : The Golden Age of Haute Couture on the Opposite Sides of the World.

 Mark Lewis Higgins will discuss the twilight of World War II, and the decade of 1947 to 1957, as a backdrop to two parallel stories and careers that were happening in Paris and Manila. The designers were Christian Dior and Salvacion Lim Higgins. This period is what fashion historians now refer to as the Golden Age of Haute Couture.

The event is supported by Ayala Land Premier and BPI.  “We are glad to support an event that promotes Filipino craftsmanship and design, and at the same time provides our clients with special experiences and empowering financial solutions,” said Jenelyn Z. Lacerna, BPI SVP and Unsecured Lending and Cards, Product and Sales head.

The complete list of participants:

PHxMaArte:  Alexie, BAGASÁO, Basic Movement x Polo Redux, Café City Club, ec / Eustacia, Feanne, HA.MÜ, J Makitalo, Jill Lao, Jude Macasinag, Kelvin Morales, Land of Nod, Lilianna Manahan, Mich Dulce, Neil Felipp, nicolò, RANDOLF, Tropik Beatnik, and Viña Romero.

PHx MaArte also collaborated with fashion schools to present the works by CLIO DL by Clio de Leon  (De La Salle – College of Saint Benilde), Kill Joy Studios by Eugene Malabad  (iAcademy), and Le Ngok by Jiale Zhang  (SoFa Design Institute).

Apparel: ALLENA, Antukin Sleepwear, COCO & TRES, CREATIVE DEFINITIONS + LAKAT, Ethnique, Filip + Inna, Good Luck, Humans, Maison Métisse, Mich Araullo, PNay, Rurungan Collective, Two Chic, WYC Wear Your Culture

Fashion accessories: Aranaz, Beatriz, Capricho, Cariñosa, LALLY DIZON DESIGN CONCEPTS, Matthew and Melka Accessories by Ken Samudio, TdLG, MCV Designs, Vesti, Yvette’s Bags and Beads Collection, Raja Watch Co., Ramir, Siklo Pilipinas

Traditional Textiles: Balay ni Atong, Ifugao Nation, La Herminia, WVN Living

Furniture: ITO KISH, OSMUNDO FURNITURE GALLERY, Zarate Manila, Azcor Lighting Systems

Heirloom:  Gallery Deus, Gallery of Prints, Treasures of Time Fine Antiques, León Gallery, and Unang Panahon Arts and Antiques.

Home Accessories: Beyond Borders Philippines, Cabaña Workshop, Daily Schedule PH, DOMESTICITY – TILIA, Gifts and Graces Fair Trade Foundation, Iraya Mangyan Art, Kassa, Milvidas, Touch of Craft, HOLICOW  PH, Bicol Sweetgrass Handicrafts, OLIVER & MAUDE Home, Oscar Mejia III, PINTA + PIKA PIKA, Provenciana, Silahis Center, Whimsy by Silay Export, Inc., Vallehermoso Helping Hands Foundation Inc.

Jewelry:  CARO WILSON, Maria Angelica Rare Finds, Micki Olaguer, NLagdameo, Riqueza Jewellery by Erica Concepcion-Reyes, Tim Tam Ong, and Whisenhunt Fine Jewelry.

Pottery: Joey De Castro Pottery, ORYOQI Ceramics, and Siegrid Bangyay Pottery.

Food and Beverage: Auro Chocolate, The Pantry \ Domicillo Selections, and Tsaa Laya.

For details, MaArte Fair on Instagram @maartefair and Facebook at www.facebook.com/maartefair.

Philippine Art Events Inc., the group that owns and operates Art Fair Philippines and Art in the Park will run MaArte at the Pen 2022. For more information contact [email protected] or [email protected] or [email protected]


Newsletter
Sign up for our Newsletter

Sign up for Diarist.ph’s Weekly Digest and get the best of Diarist.ph, tailored for you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.